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on u.s. foreign policy. i'm ralph begleiter. this week we ask, "should the u.s. give up on haiti?" to help answer this question we'll be joined by great decision participants in dallas and by our experts: ray walser, a senior policy analyst at the heritage foundation and michael shifter, president of the inter-american dialogue. thanks to both of you for being with us on great decisions. right to the top question, "should the united states give up on haiti?" ray. >> the question, i think, is posed in a moral sense, "should the u.s. do a particular, make a particular decision regarding haiti?" i don't think that is the way the question should be posed. "will the u.s. give up on haiti?" and i'm afraid that the answer may be that the u.s. over time, will tend to give up on haiti because the problems that it faces there and the reconstruction process dealing with an impoverished country with low levels of human capital and financial capital, given its tendency to move towards political division, ah, the insecurities there and the competing interests that we face around the world in a
military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands of people could die. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforce enforc
once the bombing stops. it's still u.s. policy for gadhafi to go. but that's not the mandate of the united nations mission. this hour, live reports, new information about the battle plan right now, and the president's end game. >>> and fright thing new set backs in japan's nuclear crisis. officials try to put to rest concerns of contaminated food. i'm wolf blitzer you're in "the situation room." >>> anti-aircraft fire over tripoli just a little while ago. one u.s. official tells us coalition attacks appear to have stalled moammar gadhafi and his forces. it's unclear what the libyan leader may be doing next or where he is even right now. gadhafi's compound took a pounding today. u.s. and allied commanders deny they're specifically targeting him or his residents. one u.s. commander acknowledged that gadhafi may still be in power when the bombing stops. president obama says the u.s. will try to push gadhafi out. but within the limits sanctioned by the united nations. >> it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. we have a wide range of tools to support that policy. when it come
. this morning, target libya. u.s. and european forces pound libya overnight. taking out key targets at the u.s. gets embroiled in a new overseas conflict. now moammar gadhafi is surrounding key sites with women and children to create a human shield. how involved will the u.s. get? >>> hope and fear. nine days after the tsunami, an incredible rescue. an 80-year-old woman and a teenage boy found alive. but then, there's this. the drinking water in tokyo, now tainted with radiation. >>> fall from grace. he was the most famous bear in the world. knut the polar bear has died at the young age of 4. how did he go from the top of the world to this tragic end? >>> and bullied no more. this is the video giving hope to underdogs all over the world. this boy body-slams his bully. this morning, he's telling his story. what made him snap? >>> good morning. the u.s. is now involved in its third overseas conflict. this one is called operation odyssey dawn. and throughout the night, we saw images like these. u.s. and british ships and submarines launches missiles at libyan targets to establish a no-fly zone ov
the u.s. military is getting ready to take an extraordinary step evacuating troops from the island. >>> and i'm kiran chetry. no relief in sight for homeowners. new numbers showing how weak the housing market is. and even more troubling, analysts said we may not have hit bottom yet. "american morning" starts right now. >>> all right. it is tuesday, march 22nd. a lot of news this morning. again, it's been a wild couple of weeks. >> and it's well into the day in japan. already another two earthquakes today. we're well into the 600s in terms of aftershocks and tremors. more concerns there. >> we're going to bring everybody up to date on that. but first, we're going to start with libya. coalition forces hammering moammar gadhafi's forces and positions as the head of forces in libya said the coalition flew 80 missions yesterday more than half of them by countries other than the united states. also saying that the dictator's momentum has been stopped, at least for now. but in misrata, which is a key city two hours east of tripoli, people are saying that civilians are still being massacre
coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't reach the plant. however, having said that, the levels of radiation in tokyo have returned to normal. apparently the italian embassy found that levels of radiation were a fifth of what they were in r
. this is overnight videotape from the u.s. navy, a u.s. coalition launching two nights of punishing air attacks targeting mommar gadhafi's forces, b52 bombers, jet fighters, more than 120 tom hawk cruise missiles, scattering progovernment forces on the ground in libya, the long time leader vowing a long war ahead. good morning, everybody. we've got it all covered for you. what a way to start a weefnlgt i'm bill hemmer, welcome to "america's newsroom". good morning to you martha. martha: good morning, bill. i am martha maccallum. an international air assault, all but crippling libya's air defenses, that according to the u.s. military. listen to this: >> there has been no new air activity by the regime and we have de tented no radar emissions from the defense sites targeted and there has been a significant decrease in the use of all libyan air surveillance radar which is most of those appear to be limited now only to the areas around tripoli and surt. we are not ruling out strikes against valid targets when and if the need arises. martha: there you have it, u.s., british and french planes blastin
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to ma
. and so modelers, the u.s. government, can see every level of the atmosphere. and if a piece of radiation, a big piece of radiation, a meltdown occurs, they will be able to run the models and figure out where that ra radiation's going to go. >> if there's a meltdown, as we know from chernobyl, this can kae. we have been talking about the amount of radiation that is likely released. it is not likely to have had some major effect across ocean. >> slight breaking news we haven't had on air yet. fukushima daiichi is what we have been talking about. >> right. >> shawn, zoom in. there's another plant ten miles south of there and they have issued a ten kilometer radius evacuation to that plan. this has literally happened in the past few hours. >> what is that? a fire? >> we literally doesn't know. >> some emergency. >> enough of an emergency that the people that are living around this plant are being forced to move. there's already a 30 kilometer around daiichi. >> must be unsettling to not know. he made the point, there are people who don't think the government's lying to them, they just don't
is -- u.s. red cross is extending their hand. if the american people would like to help us please get in touch with those red cross and ngos and we are very gratified for that. >> thank you so much, mr. ambassador. we wish you luck in the days ahead. up next, a nuclear power expert gives us his take on fears of a partial meltdown in japan. ♪ punching that clock from dusk till dawn ♪ ♪ countin' the days till friday night ♪ ♪ that's when all the conditions are right for a good time ♪ [ male announcer ] advanced technology that helps provide cleaner air, cleaner water, and helps make all of us more energy efficient is something the whole world can get in step with. [ static ] ♪ i need a good time [ male announcer ] ecomagination from ge. it's technology that makes the world work. ♪ should i bundle all my policies with nationwide insurance ? watch this. on one hand, you have your home insurance with one company. and on another hand, you have your auto with another. and on another hand, you have your life with another. huh... but when you bundle them all together with natio
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just bring us up to date. >> well, candidate, it's entering the seventh day of this crisis, and now at the fukushima daiichi plant trying to bring this situation under control. we saw the pictures of the helicopters, trying to spray water onto the reactors. those crews had to get out because of the radiation levels incr
was recovering from back surgery. >>> and in and out latest developments out of japan tonight. the u.s. said it could take weeks to bring the japanese nuclear complex under control. but there's no danger from leaking radiation to the western united states or specific territories right now. u.s. officials are defending their 50-mile evacuation zone for american troops and citizens in japan. the first evacuation flight of u.s. citizens left japan this afternoon. >>> a group of pastors in georgia are making a pretty big sacrifice for lent. the men are not just giving up red meat, they are eating easy to ship rice and protein based food. pastor nathaniel long has been appalled to what those give in a disaster. >> most of the time you collect foods for disasters and as a pastor, i'm appalled that folks are getting stuff that they don't want to eat. >> you start taking smaller and smaller bites trying to make it last longer. a cup and a half doesn't look like much, but it fills you up. >> pastors have been on this for five days. the real goal is to help others. the men want to spread awareness a
to see you on this monday. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. the pentagon says the u.s.-led air assault on libya has been very effective, inflicting heavy damage on government forces. the air strikes included over 120 cruise missiles, bt bombers and jet fighters. one of moammar gadhafi's compounds in tripoli was hit. but u.s. officials say gadhafi is not a target. the libyan dictator promises a long, hard war. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. susan, good morning to you. >> hi, good morning, terrell. after a weekend of heavy air strikes on libya, the main issue in washington is, where to go from here. u.s. officials are now planning a more limited role for u.s. forces going forward. u.s. officials are not planning to lead the mission in libya much longer. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. >> reporter: following a weekend of missile strikes and air patrols, defense secretary robert gates said the pentagon will soon hand over the reins to either the french and british, or to nato. his comments came as american
. we have lots of things in common with the u.s., fast, generous territory, homogeneous people, hardworking people. we don't have racial problems that affect some african countries or the wars that are waged in europe nor the religious conflict of europe itself. and therefore latin america is called to compromise or rather commitment with its own fate. and therefore we are looking forward to president obama's words. we are all left-handed. we have many coincidences. we studied in harvard, both of us. we are sportsmen. president obama continues to be a basketball player. i was in my time as well. i think the first lady of the u.s. is very good-looking, and president obama has said the same thing about the first lady of chile. there are plenty of 0 coincidences. but the most important one is the one we'll find this afternoon, and modestly if i could suggest to president obama, we hope to have a partnership that is two -- one where we have all responsibilities and not existentialism because it's never been enough. rather a partnership of collaboration between latin america and the
: at this point, 7 ships are headed to japan including the u.s.s. ronald reagan that has medical facilities as well as air lift capabilities to move people and supplies. the u.s. has 38,000 troops who were already stationed in japan. the defense department put out a video of marines ready to head to mainland japan with other assets. secretary gates says the military wants to do whatever is needed by the government of japan or by the government in tokyo. >> we have the ronald reagan closing in japan. we are sending another ship, we're pulling in helicopters from around the region, from okinawa and so on. so those ships can be used for helicopter operations in humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. >> molly: as far as american citizens in japan, so far the u.s. government has no reports of serious injuries or deaths. >> jamie: molly, the government is downplaying somewhat the risk of the radiation but search and rescue seems viable at this point. what teams other than we spoke will be going there. >> molly: they are serious experts. usig says two teams have been deployed to japan at the
as u.s. and european countries continue pounding targets across -- targets across lib yeah. linda so is standing -- libya. linda so is standing by with the latest. >> reporter: he is vowing to fight long war but there's a strong message that he is not safe. u.s. and allied forces struck his compound just yards from his tent. the u.s. says he was not a target but the goal was to take out his military capabilities. it's unclear where he was during the attack. this is the second day of air strikes. international force pound the targets with cruise missiles stealth bombers and fighter jets. the u.s. says a no-fly zone is in place and will hand over control of the military operation to a european or nato led coalition in days. >> we will continue to support the coalition. we will be a member of the coalition. we will have a military role in the coalition. but we will not have the preeminent role. >> reporter: a u.s. official says he is not sure how long this military effort in libya will last or if qaddafi will step down. if you go to abc2news.com, we have posted the latest on the main pa
, and the west coast. it appears the u.s. has escaped significant damage. we'll check in with meteorologist jeff ranieri in san francisco in a moment. first, joining me on the phone from tokyo is our producer, arata yamamoto. hello, arata. >> reporter: hi. >> there have been more than 100 aftershocks of a magnitude of five or greater, i believe. are you feeling these? >> reporter: some of them. not all. i am 188 miles south of the epicenter. ones i feel here are not as many as that. >> and are you seeing any further signs of damage where you are? >> reporter: not here in tokyo. i think the damage that was caused in tokyo, we heard reports of a walkway collapsing and we have reports of death here but that was from the first earthquake, not from the following aftershock. >> i believe the road system, as well, has been damaged in tokyoingtokyo i , a number of high ways closed, correct? >> reporter: the roads are closed. and what's compounded that is the fact that up until around midnight most of the train system was shut down which meant that everyone, people working in tokyo on a friday, busy frid
missiles fired as the u.s. military gets involved in a third muslim country. >>> and break down the three big stories in my new sunday sports trifecta. >>> good morning. welcome to fox 5 news sunday. the fair fax county search and rescue team is back in the u.s. after a heroing mission in japan. we'll hear back after they arrive home this morning. >>> first an early morning house fire. a sprawling 10,000 square foot home in hunting town, maryland, went up in flames. now none of the injuries are life threatening. investigators believe it started in the chimney. the home as you can see here is a total loss. >>> now to the latest on the crisis in libya. the air assault has begun. more than 100 tom hawk cruise missiles fired from u.s. and british warships rained down on libya. the target radar sites in the capitol of tripoli. they also hit targets on the ground. ohm battled leader gadafi is promising to fight back calling the attacks a "crusader aggression." clearing the way for a no-fly zone approved by the united nations on thursday night. the u.s. is leading a coalition of some 20 nations
three mile island by his estimates. but as chu tells it, even the u.s. government doesn't really precisely know what's happening there. so keep that in mind as we show you some of these pictures that aired live today. what you're looking at there, it's either smoke, could be steam, it rose today from the plant after officials reported a second atomic reactor may have ruptu ruptured. later on, a japanese spokesman seemed to walk that statement back saying damage to the number 3 reactor appeared not to be that severe. so, going forward, we say who knows. but here's what we know. here's the thing. radiation levels then spiked above the plant which prompted the japanese to ground those helicopters trying to cool the plant. we talked about this yesterday, how those helicopters were going to drop some of the cooler water on the plants. but keep this in mind. they've now got concerns at all six reactors. you see them, 1 through 6, right in front of you, including the two off to the side, numbers 5 and 6. then you have 4, 5 and 6. they were all offline when the tsunami hit last friday, b
council resolution 1973. u.s. and british forces launched 12 tomahawk land attack missiles, targeting command-and-control facilities service to skirt -- a scud facility and a re-attack of the previous air site. forces from france, spain, italy, denmark, and united kingdom, with missions to sustain a no-fly zone in benghazi, to protect civilians from attack, and conduct further reconnaissance. coalition naval vessels sustained maritime controls toward u.n. security council resolution, to prevent the illegal shipments of arms to and from libya. iss our actions are generally achieving the intended objections. we have not observed a libyan military aircraft operating since the beginning of operations. the naval vessels have returned to or remain in port. cents initial strikes, no regime long range air defense radars. air attacks have succeeded in stopping regime ground forces from advancing to benghazi and we are now seeing ground forces moving southward from benghazi. we will, of course, watch these ground force movements closely. through a variety of reports, we know regime ground force
of course sending a massive amount of aid and the u.s. military. the u.s.s. ronald reagan, the carrier strike group has an aircraft carrier and a number of united states ships there assisting in the rescue efforts as well as using-- we saw this in hurricane katrina, of course, the military and coast card using the massive ships as basically floating hospitals where they have fresh water and dave you pointed out earlier, the des desalization process. >> and that's vital and 70 countries offered aid including china which is interesting because they've been very contentious for years and years, especially in the last couple, over an incident that international waters in japan, and we won't get into the particulars, however, china came to their aid and offered condolences, offered money and as we've pointed out, the united states appears to be leading the way and we're supposed to check in with the 7th fleet of the navy later on this morning what they're doing to help. >> alisyn: you can see already, food ap supplies are distributed by our military and meanwhile, satellite photos are just
tomorrow on what happened in japan and lessons learned for the u.s., what do you think you're going to s learnsome. >> guest: we're going to have a meeting tomorrow with the full commission at the nrc to get an update on the current status onm the situation in japan. we'll probably have a brief discussion then about what kind of impact radiation can have for the public, and then we'll take a look at some things, kind ofei plan for a plan for how we intend to go forward to do our review and look at what, what kinds of thing we may need tod look at for the u.s. nuclear reactors. >> host: and with the fukushima plant in particular, we're told this morning that two of the six reactors are now under control, but japanese officialsix indicating this facility eventually will have to be shut down. >> guest: welling right nowwill we're continuing to -- well, right now we're continuing to monitor the situation. we have a team of 11 nrc experts who are in tokyo, and they're working with their counterparts there to get information. right now our focus continues to be to insure cooling for three of t
to what we are seeing in japan. thanks again. >> thank you. >> the u.s. gets roughly 20% of energy from nuclear power and there have been calls from both sides of the isaisle to increas the number. in the wake of the disaster chuck todd asked chuck schumer if he's rethinking that position. >> we're going to have to see what happens here obviously. it's still -- still things are happening, but the bottom line is we do have to free ourselves of independence from foreign oil and the other half of the globe. libya showed that. prices are up. our economy is hurt by it or could be hurt by it. i'm willing to look at nuclear. it has to be done safely and carefully. >> let's bring in nbc news white house correspondent mike viqueira. where does the energy debate stand as we move into the new work week in washington, d.c., especially based on what we are seeing coming out of japan? >> reporter: it's interesting. it's a matter of energy policy and politics as well. it was just a day before yesterday, thomas, when the president of the united states at a press conference friday here at the executive
is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is parting with some of her toys. >> this is tigger. >> tigger is going to be hard. >> reporter: the florenc
much time. u.s. and allied warships are stationed off the coast of libya ready to launch cruise missile that would take out qaddafi's command centers and air defense network. after that, aircraft-- mostly british and french operating from bases in the mediterranean-- would enforce a no-fly zone and threaten his ground forces with air strikes if they attack the rebels. the president promised no american troops would gol into libya while one way or another, said secretary of state clinton, qaddafi has to go. >> we do believe that a final result of any negotiations would have to be the decision by colonel qaddafi to leave. >> reporter: secretary clinton will be in paris tomorrow for one last round of talks with allies. but unless qaddafi orders first a cease-fire and then a retreat, the time for talking seems to be up. tonight there is no sign qaddafi's forces are observing a cease-fire much less pulling back. in fact, one u.s. official says they are still advancing on benghazi. harry? >> smith: david, what happens if these qaddafi forces keep moving toward benghazi? >> reporter: benghazi
, water, blankets and shelter from the bitter cold. >>> the u.s. government is taking no chances with citizens and troops in japan. it is now telling all americans to stay at least 50 miles away from the crippled nuclear reactor in fukushima. our foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty is live at the white house with more on what they're recommending to americans that are in japan right now. hey, jill. >> hey, kiran. there's been a lot of change so let's go through it. late last night the state department announcing that they're having what's called a voluntary departure for the families of people who work in three different locations, embassies and consulate and another location in japan, so that is the u.s. embassy in tokyo, the consulate in nagoya and also the fsi, foreign service institute field school in yokohama. those people are being authorized to leave. they're not being forced or ordered to leave. it's voluntary still. state department says that it will have clarter planes available for those people to leave, 3600 if necessary. alsoer this saying those charter plan
will hear from someone within the nuclear industry. michael freelander is a former operator of u.s. power plants and he will share his insig hts in the newsroom. >>> eight experts on their way to japan to help deal with the nuclear crisis but no one, as far as we know from the international atomic energy agency or the i.a.e.a. is in japan. it's monitoring the situation from austria. even to protect people from harmful radiation exposure. jim walsh joins us. the u.s. is stepping up to help. we have troops over there helping out. we have nuclear experts from the united states going over. those 50 japanese workers are still in the plant risking their lives. so why isn't the i.a.e.a. there? >> well, a couple of things going on here. one is that the i.a.e.a. relies on its member states. the u.s., france, countries who are part -- who are members of i.a.e.a. to provide most of the personnel sent over. they don't have a huge staff themselves. but they are -- they should be acting in a coordinating role of preparing in advance and helping to make this and helping to make the transfer of talent an
almost $2 billion in appropriations and putting the u.s. taxpayer on the hook for another $40 billion in potential liabilities. mr. secretary, this committee never consented to these increases, authorization bills are needed for each bank spelling out specific forms and possibility withholding funds until forms are met. i can't support writing blank checks to the institutions. capital increases will be extremely difficult to justify without convincing evidence that the taxpayer dollars will be used in a more effective and transparent manner than they have been used in the past. mr. secretary, i predict the subcommittee will face difficult choices. we'll have to look at each request to determine what is critical to our national security. we must prioritize spending by looking at what works, what is good oversight, and what is not duplicated elsewhere. i urge you to approach the subcommittee with your request in that context today and as the year progresses. finally, i want to mention the unique role the treasury department plays in u.s. foreign policy. your work to administer sanctions
. the u.s. military is sending a nine-member team to japan, as early as today, to help evacuate -- to evaluate the nuclear situation. it's not clear if they will go to the plant that's been damaged. president obama is due to make a statement at 3:30 eastern time. joining me now is a physicist who has worked on nuclear reactor accident simulations. thank you for joining us. >> nice to be here. >> let's talk about this breaking news at this power cable may be down very soon and this could finally provide some power to unit number three. one of those -- unit number two, excuse me. one of those units affected in this crisis. >> i think that's an extremely good news. if a.c. power had been restored within, you know, a day, we wouldn't have had any of the problems we're dealing with right now. it's too bad it's taken six days, going on seven, to get power there. but restoration of a.c. power will make a huge difference, especially at the three nuclear reactors. >> one of your concerns is that we're seeing trouble with three reactors and them having the problem at the same time there.
earthquakes the world has ever seen. 8.9 quake hting japan overnight. the waves now barreling towards the u.s. pictures we are seeing out of japan are unimaginable. it's wave after wave literally swallowing up cars, boats and homes. some terrifying moments in an airport outside of tokyo when the quake hit. watch this video. now there is one report. you find the capital city of tokyo. that report that confirmed. but an earthquake of horrific proportions causing buildings to shake and the tsunami that followed. seldom have we seen images like this. welcome to "america's newsroom." martha: this quake struck just after 3:00 p.m. local time in japan while most of us were sleeping. this was the scene. unbelievably powerful waves crashing ashore causing wired spread destruction. there are massive fires being dealt with and a nuclear emergency. we have more details on that. bill: there was so much to watch and do have, we'll do our best it, the 7th largest earthquake ever record. it's the largest to hit japan. evacuations underway in several coastal towns. trace gallagher joins us with more on that.
of search and rescue teams. so far from australia, new zealand, south korea, and the united states. the u.s. has also sent navy ships to japan to help out with the relief. it's also helping with what president obama calls "lift capacity." heavy lifting equipment. the u.s. also sent supplies to help cool those nuclear reactors there. poland is offering to send firefighters. president medvedev of russia says his country has offered rescuers and sniffer dogs and "all possible aid." thailand is offering about $165,000 in aid. it says it will consider offering more when the extent of the damage is known. and the international red cross say they've mobilized 11 teams to the heavily damaged areas. they have tents and relief supplies ready to pass on to local red cross teams. >>> and the u.s. is sending military ships loaded with supplies and search and rescue teams to help japan, as well. let's get more on the u.s. response. elise, as i understand it, japan is leading the efforts and setting the priorities. is that what you're being told, as well? >> that's right, randi. the japanese government ha
of condolence, is set to address the nation on the crisis that takes a new turn by the hour. >>> today, the u.s. military began drafting plans to evacuate dependents from several bases in the region. the state department says it's now actively assisting other americans wishing to evacuate. among those heeding these warnings are many of our nbc colleagues. but what will they carry with them? at chicago's o'hare and dallas-ft. worth airports, radiation levels, thankfully low, have been picked up on passengers returning from japan. but the battle and the focus remain on the fukushima station and its crippled reactors. reactor number three, the scene of aerial water bombardment today, brave crew members dropped sea water in a desperate attempt to cool what is being describes as the single greatest threat. the fukushima six reactors, reactor three is the only one housing a mixed fuel known as mox, short for mixed oxide, a material made of reclaimed plutonium, the release of which would pose far more devastating effects than weave seen thus far. reactor four and its lack of water set off the biggest
in the u.s. earlier an aunt of the infant said a u.s. hospital agreed to care for joseph. joseph's parents have been battling with the canadian hospital caring for the 14 month old. doctors say the disease is fatal and they decided to go ahead and remove his breathing tube although his parents believe that removeing that tube would cause him to choke and die violent li. fox news just learned that the terminally ill infant known as baycy joseph just arrived here in the u.s. we will keep you informed of any new developments with that story as they become available. we did learn that his parents have brought him here to seek medical care because they weren't getting the care that they thought he should receive in canada. if you want to know more about the story log on to fox news .com to find out the very latest on this fox news exclusive. now, back to "geraldo at large" already in progress. anks to the venture card from capital o, we get double miles on every purchase. so we earned a trip to new orlns twice as fast! bebebebebebaaa! we get double miles every time we e our card, no matter what
american ally, u.s. war ships arriving earlier today and with help and supplies and our doug mche willway new live from washingtons and what's the american help for relief on this. >> the aircraft carrier u.s.s. reagan and battle groups as well as other military personnel conducted well over 20 missions providing humanitarian arrive and orion aircraft over debris fields trying to judge, and also looking for survivors. >> a 60-year-old man out to sea clinging to the roof. and he went to his house and got some belongses and out to sea and his apparently his wife remains missing. they're providing civilian to humanitarian aid and two search and rescue teams from west fairfax, virginia, and others to the quake zone and much equipment must come by roadway and the roads of course have been heavily damaged, no he it willing when they will get there with equipment and they are among rescue teams sent from ten different countries and the american red cross, also accepting donations, go to foxnews.com for information how to donate to them. the red cross basically serving as a secondary roll to the
[ gunfire ] >>> when the u.s. bombed libya, the first retaliation unfolded on our newscast. explosions and heavy gunfire lighting up the night sky like fireworks. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com circumstance success >>> and from war to fear. misery and also miracles. nine days buried beneath the rubble in japan, rescued alive. >>> and a story here in the united states that certainly deserves your attention tonight. [ gunfire ] >> boy, look at that. how a frightening hostage situation ends when the s.w.a.t. team opens fire. hello, everyone. i'm don lemon. thanks for joining us. we start tonight. this is tripoli just a short time ago. take a look. [ gunfire ] >> loud explosions ring out in libya's capital city. it is midnight right now in that country and in the midst of all this unrest this is what libya's state-run government broadcasting is running right now. it's a tale of two very different realities. we'll show you that in a moment. as we go on air, the libyan army is announcing a second cease-fire, yet moammar gadhafi's group is blasting fire into the night skiet
information here. this is tape up from not too long ago. the u.s. house of representatives has just voted to pass the bill to defund national public radio, npr. the final tally was 228 yeas, 192 nays. so the u.s. house officially has spoken. >>> not too far away from capitol hill it, live pictures at the white house. we're waiting here. any minute the president will be speaking in the rose garden. we're told this was announced just today. he'll be making some sort of brief comment and specifically about japan. we don't know yet fell offer up a little time on the back end to take questions from some of those white house corps reporters. dan lothian is standing by for me as is gloria borger. standing by, as well. dan, let's first set the scene here. i mean, we have just found out today that the president would be speaking. what will do you know about what he may say and also talk about what he's just done this afternoon with regard to the japanese embassy. >> that's right. that's the hint perhaps as to what the president will say when he made that visit unexpected, a stop the an the japanes
libya's air defenses. the u.s. and british military fired a total of 124 tomahawk cruise missiles. u.s. officials say they are getting ready to hand over operational control of the military mission. >> we expect in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we'll be a member of the coalition. we'll have a military role in the coalition. we will not have the pre-eminent role. >> let's get the military perspective on this from cnn's pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence. let's start with secretary gates pledge to hand over control in just a couple days. first, what exactly does that mean and is it realistic? >> what it means is they are looking now to set up some sort of structure by which another entity could take control that could be nato although i've been told by a source that there is some reluctance to fly under a nato flag and another thing is so up a separate command and control structure. in one key area u.s. participation may have already peaked this morning. i was told just this morning by an offi
leader qaddafi says he will do whatever it takes to stay in control. even as u.s. and european forces continue to pound targets across libya. linda so is standing by with the latest. >> reporter: well, qaddafi is vowing to fight a long war. but the latest offense sigh sending a strong message that -- offensive is sending a strong message that he is not safe they struck his compound yards from his tent. the u.s. says he was not a target rather the goal was to take out his military capabilities. it's unclear whether qaddafi was-- where qaddafi was during the attack. this is the second day of air strikes. u.s. and allied forces pounded targets across libya with cruise missiles and stealth bombers and fighter jets. u.s. says a no-fly zone is in place and insist it will hand over control to european or nato led coalitions in a matter of days. >> we will continue to support the colation and be a member of the coalition. we will have a military role but we will not have the preeminent role. >> reporter: a u.s. official says he is not sure how long the offense will last or if qaddafi will ste
explains the mission. >> reporter: the u.s. officials telling fox news they are anxious to put an arab face on this coalition as soon as possible. pentagon officials repeated sunday that they plan to hand over command and control of the mission in days, not weeks. qatar sent four planes to join french fighter jets but some arab countries are coming with caveats how the airplanes can be used. >> there are french airplanes over benghazi. we will have a 24-7 cap there from now on and effectively he hasn't flown anything in the last couple of days so i would say the no-fly zone that we were tasked to put in place is in place. >> reporter: commanders on the ground in the middle east were not quite ready to go so far suggesting with a country the size of alaska it would take time, hence the next wave of tomahawks following the 114 missiles filed saturday from the uss berry, a navy destroyer, three u.s. submarines and one british sub. initial satellite photos show the need for more tomahawk strikes. officials did not expect the mission to include targeting moammar gadhafi personally. >> i haven't
the reason why things have changed overnight here is because up until, you know, this morning, the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission said japan is taking the right steps, in agreement with the way japan was handling it and have come out and as you have said have been downplaying the situation, haven't been giving all the information that they think should be available. so what we know is that these workers have to cool these plants, these reactors, these spent fuel rods if they're exposed for too long, they emit radioactivity, radioactive material so that is the danger. water cannons are being brought in to pump and spray water. that is something they have said will take place. they had planned to bring helicopters over and dump water into these pools, but that was scrapped because of high winds and high levels of radiation. now, john, there are some 180 workers, it started off with a skeleton workers of just 50. it has increased to 180 workers. they are inside that plant battling explosion, battling fires and trying desperately to pump that water in and they are the people who are tr
are about 75, 80 miles from that initial reactor. we are outside of the ring by a good amount. u.s. helicopters according to one new york times report detected particles as far as 50 miles in the air. was it inland out in the water? the breezes blowout to sea so we are thinking it's out that way. that is a significant development. right now if you take all of the reports about what is going on the japanese will tell you anywhere between 200 and 300 thousand people have been evacuated from near those two different sites. again there are 120 kilometers apart. the first one is 75-80 miles up the coast from where i am standing now. those are up to 200, 300 thousand people have been evacuated 200 people have been treated for nuclear exposure from japanese sources from the government. those numbers are getting pretty solid since this morning when we got here i have been monitoring all of the feeds coming in as we can. it's a serious situation something everybody is watching extremely closely. you have already dealt with an earthquake here a tsunami significant after shocks and now this.
citizens to leave the capital. the austrian government is moving its embassy here to osaka. u.s. embassy officials nbc news has learned had a meeting earlier today with folks who work there, with their families to try to elay some of the concerns of americans living here in tokyo. it has been confirmed for us. we talked to people involved in the meeting that several people stood up and said, should i stay or should i go? that is the question a lot of people, especially people are asking here, and it's a very individual kind of answer. three separate families came out of the embassy in the hour that i was standing there. all of them said they were considering leaving. when i talked to james wright, who was there with his wife, his 3-year-old daughter, and 5-month-old twins, he was getting the twins' passports so that if they decided to leave, they could. how would he make that decision? here's what he told me. has the nuclear situation made you rethink staying in japan? >> well, it depends on how the wind blows, actually. >> reporter: literally? >> literally. if the wind blows this way, t
in the middle of grand central station. and an even bigger reveal. the new jobs being sown in the u.s. right now. >>> good evening. not long ago, a cancer diagnosis felt like a death sentence. not anymore. huge numbers of americans, hundreds of thousands more each year, are surviving and living with cancer. numbers just released from the centers for disease control show that 1 in 20 american adults is now a cancer survivor, almost 12 million of us. we are catching cancer earlier and treating it more effectively. and ron claiborne is here with what it all means for the survivors and the people that love them. this is such encouraging news. >> reporter: this is really important news tonight, george. so many people are now living with and beating cancer. four times as many as 40 years ago. in fact, the cdc said today that for millions of americans, cancer is now a manageable disease. >> reporter: they send us their videos. poignant messages celebrating their struggle against cancer. today, the nearly 12 million adult americans who are cancer survivors, compared to just 3 million in 1970. >> life do
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